The Controversy

Can someone with autism be allowed to put their life on the in the ring? This is not an easy answer. Sports are great for everyone, including those with autism. It builds confidence and communication skills. You can see the reference articles we have here. Even learning to box is great for exercise and skill attainment. The question is what happens if that individual wants to take it to the next level? There are two professional MMA fighters right now with autism so it has been done. Check out this recent interview with Dr. Farrago about the topic.

There are built-in assumptions about people with autism, many of which are unfair. But because there is a spectrum to this issue there are no clear cut answers. The following are comments that are being left on Facebook right now. Feel free to leave your comment below and join the conversation. Also, please buy and read NOKI and tell me if I handled this controversy in an appropriate manner.

Please consider reading NOKI to understand this controversy even more.

So what you are actually asking here is is an autistic person capable of making their own decisions. Because it is ABSOLUTELY their right to put thier own health at risk. Who decides?

Its a spectrum… people with autism can do anything. My son boxes my daughter dances… they are both attractive healthy happy kids. Tell me which one has autism?

If they are physically capable then yes. It all depends on their personal capabilities. It may not be the best place for someone who has major issues with physical contact. But someone who has major issues in vocal communication should be ok.

My son, 26, wants to box. Honestly, I will not allow him (at this time). I see infinite opportunities for brain damage.

Why should autism have any bearing on this? an individual with autism should have the same right to choose as anyone else

Every career and hobby has its cost/risk and its reward. One could say that the glue from model airplanes carries the same risk. They have the same possible cost but what are the rewards? Introduce it slow if you do. Water boy, cut-man, towels. Let him train a bit at a gym. Let him spar. Let him get a (safer) feel. Work with people. A lot would be excited to help someone try it out.

“People with autism don’t have these issues it’s the supposed normal person that can’t understand. Let Noki be Noki. BOX.

I agree that autistic people are just as capable as every other person. And they should be able to do what they love. But also keep the other point of view. Which person, in a real boxing match, would feel ok hitting an autistic person in the head? You see, if someone like this person wants to box also have a decision. And if anything went wrong, they wouldn’t want to live with it.

1 comment

  1. boxer are fighters. to hit and be hit. your view of which person would feel ok hitting an autistic person shows that you see us as weak. as someone who has no protection of ourselves. look at the world of autism then more than just one case. in my case, you’d have to worry about the other boxer getting hit, not me. the thing your not seeing here is, this book is especially for you. He’s challenging your exact view. yes, autistics get taken advantage of. yes we do have our awkwardness. yes, we have our issues. so do all other humans. don’t look at us like we break like eggshells. we have over reactions to being over stimulated. we have our times we cannot speak our emotions. we have trouble recognizing certain things. we are not born of vaccines. or anything new. autism has been around for ages. we just recently started understanding it. my question for you. if a person with autism, breaks into your house to rob you, would you defend yourself? because in the ring, you’d have to. in the robbery situation, the same. we are a determined type of people. i came up with a book title. 14 years later, a writing fervor. 4 years of that fervor and its here. 396 page poetry book. we are savants and the ones who stay silent. it doesn’t mean we are not strong. that we cannot achieve our dreams.

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